Vegan diet programs may seem to be just another eating trend, but research has found that there may be more to it than you think.  Many people roll their eyes when they hear they need to alter their dinner party menu for that guest who will only eat plant-based foods, but they may not do it as much when they find out about the benefits of that eating strategy.

That person ahead of you in line ordering their latte with almond milk or oat milk, or who wants vegan egg substitute in their breakfast burrito could potentially outlive the average American, says recent science. One new study has shown that vegan diet programs, when done right, can boost overall health and measurably improve longevity.

Recent Research into Vegan Diet Programs

Many people have simply assumed that vegan diet programs are the healthier way to go. At the same time, they can seem extreme enough that people aren’t actually willing to follow them.  After all, why skip that delicious burger or steak today for what may one day reduce your risk of heart disease or cancer, right?

While it’s not exactly true that sidestepping all animal-based foods will ensure that you’ll live a long and healthy life, a plant-based diet can improve your odds in several areas.  Past research had already consistently been showing that vegan diet programs can decrease your chances of high blood pressure, heart disease and several forms of cancers.  However, a new study has gone above and beyond those claims.

Living Longest Without Eating Meat

The results of a new study were published in The Journal of Nutrition.  They examined the way in which a number of vegan diet programs and non-vegan eating strategies impact various biomarkers.  These biomarkers included antioxidants such as carotenoids.  What they determined was that the body of the average vegan contains considerably higher antioxidant levels than those of others, most probably because they eat the largest amounts of fruits and vegetables.

The study involved data from 840 people who each followed one of five different types of eating style: vegan diet programs, lacto-ovo vegetarians, pesco-vegetarians, semi-vegetarians, and non-vegetarians.  Participants in the study gave urine, blood and fat samples.  The scientists used these samples to measure vitamin, antioxidant, saturated fat and unsaturated fat levels.

Among all the participants, those following vegan diet programs had the highest levels carotenoids (antioxidants) as well as enterolactone and isoflavones – known for decreasing inflammation.  They also had more omega-3 fatty acids in their bodies.  That said, before making any major dietary changes, it’s always important to speak with your doctor.  A vegan diet, as potentially healthful as it can be, is not necessarily appropriate for everyone.